Skills Managers Look for When Promoting Millennials

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Disruptive technologies have long changed how we conduct business – never more so than now with the rise of cloud and mobile technology. Adoption of these disruptive technologies is further fueled by an increase of Millennials entering the workplace – the first generation of workers to grow up using technology as part of their everyday lives. So what are the skills managers look for when promoting Millennials?

With Millennials on pace to make up 50 percent of the U.S. workforce by 2020, many workplaces are already feeling their influence and are beginning to embrace the change in work styles. Millennials think differently in regard to how work should be conducted and this new generation of workers is also ushering in a new generation of work rules and priorities. They’re more focused on giving back to the community, moving away from their desks as well as the traditional 9-to-5 workday, collaborating more and creating an organization constructed through social media.  

Skills Managers Look for When Promoting Millennials

Help me, help you

To have job security, employees have to be considered an invaluable employee. For Millennials to move up into higher level roles, they must look beyond their job description and realize that they are always expected to do more than what they were hired to do for that position. 

Citizen Developers are a great example of this, as they are finding ways to make life easier for their department by developing applications that take employees out of spreadsheet madness and improve processes. This DIY application development makes the entire department more efficient, not just employees or their manager. Those are the skills managers looks for when promoting Millennials, and the types of efficiencies that are propelling younger Citizen Developers forward in their careers.

Tech-savvy Citizen Developers

Managers have come to count on Millennials to facilitate the integration of technology into the workplace. They’re introducing new devices and tools that are allowing businesses to be run more seamlessly and efficiently, and they’re allowing professionals to untether themselves from their desks, conducting business anywhere, any time.

Our recent report, The next generation worker: The Citizen Developer, also found that Citizen Developers are more ambitious and going farther in their careers. In fact, we found that 53 percent of Citizen Developers expect a promotion within the coming year, compared to only 40 percent of those who do not identify themselves as Citizen Developers. This means that Citizen Developers are not only moving up in level more quickly, but are more likely to be the CEOs of tomorrow. 

Skills managers look for when promoting Millennials
Soft skills managers look for when promoting Millennials

In addition to ushering in new technology, managers have also shared that one of the important facets to a successful career are soft skills. According to an article by AOL, managers are looking for Millennials to have the ability to communicate, prioritize their work, and keep a positive attitude. 

They’re also looking for how well they work with their team. Surprisingly, our report found that tech-savvy Millennials are stepping away from technology to communicate. Nearly two-thirds of Citizen Developers prefer in-person communication with their co-workers to phone or email communication. This shows that this younger generation of workers still recognizes the importance of communication in the workplace and that they don’t rely on technology to do it, and managers looking for these soft skills are likely to take notice. 

For Millennials to get promoted, managers look for someone who is invaluable, and taking the initiative to build business applications for the company, integrating technology into the office, and prioritizing soft skills are just some of the ways that Millennials are proving that value. 

We want you to weigh in. What are other skills managers look for when promoting Millennials? Comment below or tweet us @trackvia and let us know.